Karen Stamieszkin

Karen Stamieszkin

National Science Foundation Fellow Karen Stamiezkin discuses her research on zooplankton fecal pellet carbon export in the ocean.   Transcript Karen Stamieszkin: The ocean’s full of lots of tiny living creatures. Everything in the ocean, all life, is based on carbon like all life on land. The ocean is actually a sink for carbon. As […]

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Kit Hamley

National Science Foundation Fellow Kit Hamley discuses her research on the origins of the extinct warrah in the Falkland Islands.   Transcript Kit Hamley: I’ve always been broadly interested in how humans have interacted with their environment over time. I’m looking at a time period, not just focused on the last couple of hundred years, […]

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Will Kochitzky

National Science Foundation Fellow Will Kochitzky discuses his research on glacial ice sheets.   Transcript Will Kochitzky: I have broad interests in ice bodies around the world. In my undergraduate thesis, I focused on Nevado Coropuna which is an ice cap in rural Peru. It’s one of the highest tropical ice bodies. Previous studies found […]

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Anne Marie Lausier

National Science Foundation Fellow Anne Marie Lausier discuses her research on the inclusion of stakeholder equity considerations in water management and decision-making.   Transcript Anne Marie Lausier: Maine is really lucky to have just a rich array of ecosystems and then, therefore, the services that they provide that are then valued by communities. I research the […]

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Farming the sea

Since the establishment of Maine’s first sea farm in Clark Cove in 1975, the state’s aquaculture industry has grown to 107 companies totaling approximately 113 lease sites and employing approximately 600 people. In 2014, the overall economic impact of Maine aquaculture was $137.6 million, according to a new report by the Aquaculture Research Institute at […]

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Studying water and air quality in Acadia

With more than 47,000 protected acres, 45 ponds and streams, and 10 named wetland areas within or adjacent to the park, Acadia National Park serves as an ideal place for University of Maine researchers to study a variety of topics related to water and air quality. Current projects include investigating watershed processes that lead to […]

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Park management research

John Daigle started his relationship with Acadia National Park as a park ranger while he was an undergraduate at the University of Maine. Now as a professor of forest recreation management, his work with Acadia continues in the form of park management research. Since the late 1990s, Daigle has researched topics including alternative transportation systems […]

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History of UMaine’s research partnership with Acadia

Catherine Schmitt, communications director for Maine Sea Grant College Program at the University of Maine, discusses some of the earliest connections between UMaine researchers and Acadia National Park. In tribute to Acadia’s centennial in 2016, UMaine Today is reflecting on the university’s relationship with the park, particularly in terms of significant research pertaining to the […]

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History of UMaine’s research partnership with Acadia

Catherine Schmitt, communications director for Maine Sea Grant College Program at the University of Maine, discusses some of the earliest connections between UMaine researchers and Acadia National Park. In tribute to Acadia’s centennial in 2016, UMaine Today is reflecting on the university’s relationship with the park, particularly in terms of significant research pertaining to the […]

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Citizen science in Acadia

The Dragonfly Mercury Project, which began at the University of Maine in 2012, is now engaging students and volunteers in science at about 70 national parks, including Acadia. The project encourages students, volunteers and park visitors to collect dragonfly larvae to measure mercury levels in water bodies to better understand human-caused mercury contamination in national […]

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